Islam and Democracy.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      democracy
      human rights
      lran
      lraq
      modernity
      secularism
    • Abstract:
      Comparison of post-9/11 representations of Islam and democracy in the U.S. prestige press shows that despite differences in coverage in the Turkish, Iraqi, and Iranian contexts, fear of political Islam persisted in all three discursive environments. While a political role for Islam was regarded as a threat to democracy, the U.S. prestige press emphasized the need to secularize and modernize Islam according to Western standards to render it compatible with democracy. It highlighted human rights abuses in Iran and expressed concerns about the possibility of Iraq becoming another "Iran" if the power of religious parties went unchecked. Dominant discourses in the U.S. prestige press often assumed that any visibility of religious commitment in the public and political sphere automatically implied a lack of commitment to democracy, human rights, and women's rights. Discourses that contested dominant perspectives on Islam and democracy by questioning Western hegemonic definitions were limited. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of Communication Inquiry is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Bowling Green State University
    • ISSN:
      0196-8599
    • Accession Number:
      10.1177/0196859907311694
    • Accession Number:
      31577016
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      MISHRA, S. Islam and Democracy. Journal of Communication Inquiry, [s. l.], v. 32, n. 2, p. 155–178, 2008. DOI 10.1177/0196859907311694. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=ufh&AN=31577016. Acesso em: 28 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Mishra S. Islam and Democracy. Journal of Communication Inquiry. 2008;32(2):155-178. doi:10.1177/0196859907311694
    • APA:
      Mishra, S. (2008). Islam and Democracy. Journal of Communication Inquiry, 32(2), 155–178. https://doi.org/10.1177/0196859907311694
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Mishra, Smeeta. 2008. “Islam and Democracy.” Journal of Communication Inquiry 32 (2): 155–78. doi:10.1177/0196859907311694.
    • Harvard:
      Mishra, S. (2008) ‘Islam and Democracy’, Journal of Communication Inquiry, 32(2), pp. 155–178. doi: 10.1177/0196859907311694.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Mishra, S 2008, ‘Islam and Democracy’, Journal of Communication Inquiry, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 155–178, viewed 28 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Mishra, Smeeta. “Islam and Democracy.” Journal of Communication Inquiry, vol. 32, no. 2, Apr. 2008, pp. 155–178. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1177/0196859907311694.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Mishra, Smeeta. “Islam and Democracy.” Journal of Communication Inquiry 32, no. 2 (April 2008): 155–78. doi:10.1177/0196859907311694.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Mishra S. Islam and Democracy. Journal of Communication Inquiry [Internet]. 2008 Apr [cited 2020 Nov 28];32(2):155–78. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=ufh&AN=31577016