Surgical history of ancient China: part 1.

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  • Author(s): Fu, Louis
  • Source:
    ANZ Journal of Surgery. Dec2009, Vol. 79 Issue 12, p879-885. 7p. 1 Color Photograph, 2 Black and White Photographs, 1 Illustration, 1 Diagram.
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Although surgery was an accepted and quite proficient craft very early on in Chinese history, it has deteriorated through the ages. Despite the fact that anaesthetic agents in major surgery were employed during the third century, Chinese surgery is conspicuous by its stagnation. Reverence for the dead, filial piety, abhorrence of shedding blood and other conservative attitudes make it impossible for any accurate knowledge of the human anatomy and physiology, without which surgery cannot progress. This article surveys some highlights in the history of surgery in ancient China and examines the factors responsible for its decline. The second concluding part deals with orthopaedics. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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