Life Improvement, Life Satisfaction, and Care Arrangement Among AIDS Orphans in Rural Henan, China

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    • Abstract:
      The Chinese government''s response to the increasing number of children orphaned in the HIV epidemic included setting up AIDS orphanages and supporting community-based group homes for double orphans (children who lost both parents to HIV). The impact of these strategies, compared to traditional kinship care, on children''s outcomes has not been studied in China. The purpose of this study was to compare perceived life improvement and life satisfaction among double orphans in three main care arrangements (group home, AIDS orphanage, kinship care) in two rural Chinese counties. Participants included 176 children from four orphanages, 30 from eight group homes, and 90 from kinship households. Results indicated that children living in government-supported group homes were more likely to report greater life improvement and positive attitudes toward their current lives than children in orphanages and kinship care. Results suggested that perceived life improvements may have resulted from access to basic needs in extremely poor communities. [Copyright &y& Elsevier]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of JANAC: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)