An outbreak of hepatitis B virus infection among methamphetamine injectors: the role of sharing injection drug equipment.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Aim To identify risk factors for acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among Wyoming methamphetamine injectors. Design A case–control study conducted in the setting of an outbreak. Setting A county in central Wyoming, United States. Participants Cases were identified through surveillance and contact tracing and were defined as Natrona County, Wyoming, residents who were either symptomatic or confirmed serologically to be acutely infected with HBV during January–August, 2003. Controls were susceptible to HBV infection. All participants identified themselves as methamphetamine injectors. Measurements Participants were administered a survey that inquired about risk factors for HBV infection, including drug use practices and sexual behaviors. Controls were also tested serologically for acute HBV infection. Findings Among the 18 case-patients and 49 controls who participated in the study, sharing water used to prepare injections and/or rinse syringes was associated with HBV infection (94% of case-participants versus 44% of controls; OR = 21.9, 95% CI: 2.7, 177.8), as was sharing cotton filters (89% of case-participants versus 52% of controls; OR = 7.4, 95% CI: 1.5, 35.6); sharing syringes was not statistically associated. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, and interview site, sharing rinse water and sharing cotton remained statistically associated. Conclusions Methamphetamine use has become increasingly prevalent in the United States. Our findings highlight the need for awareness of risks associated with injection drug use and sharing behaviors. Enhanced hepatitis B vaccination programs and educational campaigns that target methamphetamine injectors specifically, including those living in rural areas, should be developed and implemented. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Addiction is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)