Dietary Sodium, Potassium, and Sodium to Potassium Ratio in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

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    • Abstract:
      Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary sodium, potassium, and sodium:potassium ratio and clinical disease activity parameters, damage accrual, and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a population of patients with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). Research design and study sample: A cross-sectional study including a total of 280 patients was conducted (90.4% females; mean age 46.9 ± 12.85 years). Data collection: The SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI-2K) and the SDI Damage Index were used to assess disease activity and disease-related damage, respectively. A 24-hour diet recall was used to estimate dietary intake of sodium and potassium. Results: Dietary sodium intake was significantly associated with anti-dsDNA (β = −.005; 95% CI [.002.008]; p =.001) and complement C4 level (β = −.002; 95% CI [−.003,.000]; p =.039). Dietary potassium intake was also significantly associated with complement C3 level (β = −.004; 95% CI [−.007, −.001]; p =.021). Multiple logistic regression models revealed a positive association between dietary sodium intake and the risk of having hsCRP > 3 (p =.005) and an inverse association between dietary potassium intake and the risk of having hsCRP > 3 (p =.004). Conclusions: SLE patients with higher dietary sodium and lower dietary potassium intakes had an increased risk of higher hsCRP. Dietary sodium intake was significantly associated with anti-dsDNA and complement C4 level, while dietary potassium intake was associated with complement C3 level, supporting that dietary sodium and potassium intakes might play a key role in markers related to disease activity in SLE patients. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
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