Language Preference and Risk of Primary Cesarean Delivery: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    • Abstract:
      Objectives: While some medical indications for cesarean delivery are clear, subjective provider and patient factors contribute to the rising cesarean delivery rates and marked disparities between racial/ethnic groups. We aimed to determine the association between language preference and risk of primary cesarean delivery. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of nulliparous, term, singleton, vertex (NTSV) deliveries of patients over 18 years old from 2011–2016 at an academic medical center, supplemented with data from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. We used modified Poisson regression with robust error variance to calculate risk ratios for cesarean delivery between patients with English language preference and other language preference, with secondary outcomes of Apgar score, maternal readmission, blood transfusion, and NICU admission. Results: Of the 11,298 patients included, 10.3% reported a preferred language other than English, including Mandarin and Cantonese (61.7%), Portuguese (9.7%), and Spanish (7.5%). The adjusted risk ratio for cesarean delivery among patients with a language preference other than English was 0.85 (95% CI 0.72–0.997; p = 0.046) compared to patients with English language preference. No significant differences in risk of secondary outcomes between English and other language preference were found. Discussion: After adjusting for confounders, this analysis demonstrates a decreased risk of cesarean delivery among women who do not have an English language preference at one institution. This disparity in cesarean delivery rates in an NTSV population warrants future research, raising the question of what clinical and social factors may be contributing to these lower cesarean delivery rates. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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