Urban Transformation of Muslim Spanish Cites after 1492: The Case Study of Baza, Granada (Spain); from a "Petrified" City to Its Great Expansions.

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    • Abstract:
      Spanish Islamic cities stagnated or declined after 1492. Because of the expulsion of Jews and Moors, despite the repopulation policies, they seemed to "petrify" their size. The uninhabited houses and the suburbs disappeared. The extension and population of the main Muslim cities, Almeria, Seville, Toledo, Valencia, Zaragoza, tended to decrease. Murcia and Granada are two paradigmatic cases of evolution. In the kingdom of Granada, Baza was an important settlement at the end of Middle Ages. Urban transformations adapted it to Castilian policies: mosques were transformed into churches, squares and gates were opened, some streets widened, and so on. However, its size remained "petrified." In the nineteenth century, there was a strong population growth cushioned by the phenomenon of "cave-house." From mid-twentieth century, it had a strong expansion and growth regardless urban plans. Currently, the city, declared as Historic Site, has slowed down its growth, although its planning foresees it will keep growing. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
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