Cooking With Gas, Household Air Pollution, and Asthma: Little Recognized Risk for Children.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Cooking with a gas stove releases combustion-generated nitrogen dioxide and other pollutants into household air. Both nitrogen dioxide in household air and cooking with gas are associated with increased risk and severity of childhood asthma. The impact on children can be substantial because at least one third of households in the U.S. cook with gas stoves, children spend most of their time indoors, indoor air is unregulated, and asthma is the most common chronic disease in children. The association between gas cooking stoves, household air pollution, and childhood asthma is not widely appreciated. We propose a public information campaign, public policies addressing household air pollution risks associated with cooking with gas, requirement of warning labels on gas cooking stoves, and further research on the efficacy of available interventions. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of Environmental Health is the property of National Environmental Health Association and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)