Postexercise Inflammasome Activation and IL-1β Production Mitigated by Flavonoid Supplementation in Cyclists.

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    • Abstract:
      Inflammasomes are multiprotein signaling platforms of the innate immune system that detect markers of physiological stress and promote the maturation of caspase-1 and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), IL-18, and gasdermin D. This randomized, cross-over trial investigated the influence of 2-week mixed flavonoid (FLAV) versus placebo (PL) supplementation on inflammasome activation and IL-1β and IL-18 production after 75-km cycling in 22 cyclists (42 ± 1.7 years). Blood samples were collected before and after the 2-week supplementation, and then 0 hr, 1.5 hr, and 21 hr postexercise (176 ± 5.4 min, 73.4 ± 2.0 %VO2max). The supplement (678 mg FLAVs) included quercetin, green tea catechins, and bilberry anthocyanins. The pattern of change in the plasma levels of the inflammasome adaptor oligomer ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing caspase recruitment domain) was different between the FLAV and PL trials, with the FLAV ASC levels 52% lower (Cohen's d = 1.06) than PL immediately following 75-km cycling (interaction effect, p =.012). The plasma IL-1β levels in FLAV were significantly lower than PL (23–42%; Cohen's d = 0.293–0.644) throughout 21 hr of recovery (interaction effect, p =.004). The change in plasma gasdermin D levels were lower immediately postexercise in FLAV versus PL (15% contrast, p =.023; Cohen's d = 0.450). The patterns of change in plasma IL-18 and IL-37 did not differ between the FLAV and PL trials (interaction effects, p =.388,.716, respectively). These data indicate that 2-week FLAV ingestion mitigated inflammasome activation, with a corresponding decrease in IL-1β release in cyclists after a 75-km cycling time trial. The data from this study support the strategy of ingesting high amounts of FLAV to mitigate postexercise inflammation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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