Readability, Quality, and Suitability of English-Language Internet Information about Children with Primary Speech and Language Disorders.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Healthcare professionals and other stakeholders have expressed concerns about the quality of information provided by Internet-based sources. The current study examines the website origin, type of information content, quality, readability, and suitability of English-language Internet information about children with primary speech and language disorders (S/LD). The 100 most frequently viewed websites related to children with primary S/LD were identified. Origin of website and informational content was categorized. Websites were analyzed to ascertain their readability, quality, and suitability. Statistical calculations were employed to examine website ratings, differences between website origin and readability, and quality and suitability scores. A majority of the websites were of a commercial origin. Results indicated high readability across all websites. Quality was rated as low and no differences between website origin were noted. The websites were generally rated as having adequate suitability, though learning stimulation/motivation was rated least suitable. Readability, quality, and suitability of Internet-based information are important components in the accessibility of information for people with different communication disorders. To incorporate Internet-based information in their practice, healthcare stakeholders need to be aware of the limits and benefits of available information. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of Consumer Health on the Internet is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)