A Genetic History of the Near East from an aDNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      Beirut, Bronze Age
      Classical Antiquity
      culture
      Iron Age
      Lebanon
      migration, admixture
      population genetics
      whole-genome sequences
    • Abstract:
      The Iron and Classical Ages in the Near East were marked by population expansions carrying cultural transformations that shaped human history, but the genetic impact of these events on the people who lived through them is little-known. Here, we sequenced the whole genomes of 19 individuals who each lived during one of four time periods between 800 BCE and 200 CE in Beirut on the Eastern Mediterranean coast at the center of the ancient world's great civilizations. We combined these data with published data to traverse eight archaeological periods and observed any genetic changes as they arose. During the Iron Age (∼1000 BCE), people with Anatolian and South-East European ancestry admixed with people in the Near East. The region was then conquered by the Persians (539 BCE), who facilitated movement exemplified in Beirut by an ancient family with Egyptian-Lebanese admixed members. But the genetic impact at a population level does not appear until the time of Alexander the Great (beginning 330 BCE), when a fusion of Asian and Near Easterner ancestry can be seen, paralleling the cultural fusion that appears in the archaeological records from this period. The Romans then conquered the region (31 BCE) but had little genetic impact over their 600 years of rule. Finally, during the Ottoman rule (beginning 1516 CE), Caucasus-related ancestry penetrated the Near East. Thus, in the past 4,000 years, three limited admixture events detectably impacted the population, complementing the historical records of this culturally complex region dominated by the elite with genetic insights from the general population. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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    • ISSN:
      0002-9297
    • Accession Number:
      10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.008
    • Accession Number:
      144300519
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HABER, M. et al. A Genetic History of the Near East from an aDNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years. American Journal of Human Genetics, [s. l.], v. 107, n. 1, p. 149–157, 2020. DOI 10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.008. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=hch&AN=144300519. Acesso em: 26 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Haber M, Nassar J, Almarri MA, et al. A Genetic History of the Near East from an aDNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years. American Journal of Human Genetics. 2020;107(1):149-157. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.008
    • APA:
      Haber, M., Nassar, J., Almarri, M. A., Saupe, T., Saag, L., Griffith, S. J., Doumet-Serhal, C., Chanteau, J., Saghieh-Beydoun, M., Xue, Y., Scheib, C. L., & Tyler-Smith, C. (2020). A Genetic History of the Near East from an aDNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years. American Journal of Human Genetics, 107(1), 149–157. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.008
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Haber, Marc, Joyce Nassar, Mohamed A. Almarri, Tina Saupe, Lehti Saag, Samuel J. Griffith, Claude Doumet-Serhal, et al. 2020. “A Genetic History of the Near East from an ADNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years.” American Journal of Human Genetics 107 (1): 149–57. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.008.
    • Harvard:
      Haber, M. et al. (2020) ‘A Genetic History of the Near East from an aDNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years’, American Journal of Human Genetics, 107(1), pp. 149–157. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.008.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Haber, M, Nassar, J, Almarri, MA, Saupe, T, Saag, L, Griffith, SJ, Doumet-Serhal, C, Chanteau, J, Saghieh-Beydoun, M, Xue, Y, Scheib, CL & Tyler-Smith, C 2020, ‘A Genetic History of the Near East from an aDNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years’, American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 107, no. 1, pp. 149–157, viewed 26 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Haber, Marc, et al. “A Genetic History of the Near East from an ADNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years.” American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 107, no. 1, July 2020, pp. 149–157. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.008.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Haber, Marc, Joyce Nassar, Mohamed A. Almarri, Tina Saupe, Lehti Saag, Samuel J. Griffith, Claude Doumet-Serhal, et al. “A Genetic History of the Near East from an ADNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years.” American Journal of Human Genetics 107, no. 1 (July 2, 2020): 149–57. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.008.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Haber M, Nassar J, Almarri MA, Saupe T, Saag L, Griffith SJ, et al. A Genetic History of the Near East from an aDNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years. American Journal of Human Genetics [Internet]. 2020 Jul 2 [cited 2020 Nov 26];107(1):149–57. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=hch&AN=144300519