Readability Following Cultural and Linguistic Adaptations of an Internet-Based Intervention for Tinnitus for Use in the United States.

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    • Abstract:
      Purpose: An Internet-based tinnitus intervention for use in the United States could improve the provision of tinnitusrelated services. Although clinical trials of such interventions were completed in Europe, the United Kingdom, and Australia, their suitability for adults with tinnitus in the United States is yet to be established. The aim of this study was to improve the cultural and linguistic suitability, and lower the readability level, of an existing program for tinnitus to ensure its suitability for U.S. English- and Spanish-speaking populations. Method: Guidelines for adaptation were followed and involved four phases: (a) cultural adaptations, as interventions targeted at specific cultures have been shown to improve outcomes; (b) creating Spanish materials to improve access of the materials to the large Spanish-speaking population in the United States; (c) professional review of the materials for acceptability as an intervention tool for a U.S. population; and (d) literacy-level adjustments to make the content accessible to those with lower levels of health literacy skills. Results: Cultural adaptations were made by using word substitutions, changing examples, and modifying the spelling of certain words. The materials were then translated into Spanish and cross-checked. Professional review ensured suitability of the chapters. Literacy-level adjustments ensured all chapters were within the guidelines for readability grade levels below the sixth-grade level. Conclusions: The previously developed tinnitus materials were revised to adhere to best practice guidelines and ensure cultural suitability for adults with tinnitus in the United States. As it is also available in Spanish, members of the large Hispanic community also have access to the intervention in their first language. Further studies should determine whether these changes improve patients' selfefficacy, engagement, and motivation to complete the intervention. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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