Correlation of human papillomavirus types with clinical features of patients with condyloma acuminatum in China.

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    • Abstract:
      Background Condyloma acuminatum ( CA)-related human papillomavirus ( HPV) typing has focused on the prevalence of HPV types. The correlation between HPV types and the clinical features of CA has rarely been documented. Aims The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between HPV types and the clinical features of CA. Methods Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to type HPV in the CA lesions from 80 Chinese patients with full clinical data. Results We determined that HPV6 and HPV11 single infections were the most frequent and accounted for 38.7 and 36.3%, respectively. Multiple infections caused by HPV6, HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, and/or HPV31 accounted for the remaining 25%. We were the first to document the HPV11 and HPV31 co-infection in a patient with colon carcinoma infected anal CA in China. The statistical analysis demonstrated that multiple HPV infections predisposed an individual to more warts, larger warts, a longer disease course, and a greater frequency of recurrence. The cases infected with the high-risk type, HPV16, accounted for 60% of the multiple infections and had a higher relapse rate than any other type of HPV infection. Conclusions Compared with a single HPV type infection, multiple HPV infections in CA were related to a more severe disease and a worse prognosis. These data provide useful information for the treatment and prognosis of CA. Mapping the proportion of CA caused by the virus types pre-vaccination enables the prediction of the vaccination benefits regarding CA burden reduction. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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