Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers.

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  • Additional Information
    • Abstract:
      The article examines the proposition that the presence or absence of office co-workers would influence the behavior of senior managers, over and above the effects of their occupation of open or closed offices. The research presented in the article supports speculation that the presence of other people in an office worker's environment influences behavior, over and above the effects of the physical features of the office setting. A manager's experience of privacy occupies a key explanatory role. Not only are the linkages complex, some are also compensatory. For example, an audible but not visible superior has a positive direct relationship with a manager's task performance, but this form of superior presence adversely affects privacy, which is, in turn, associated with diminished performance. A closed office promotes a manager's privacy, which, in turn, leads to higher task performance due to an ability to concentrate on his or her task, and it also represents the absence of other occupants functioning as co-actors who, as suggested by social facilitation theory, might otherwise enhance performance. From the viewpoint of office designers and managers, a finely balanced judgment is therefore required to match productive work requirements with the behavioral implications of physical office arrangements.
    • Author Affiliations:
      1The University of Melbourne
    • ISSN:
      0018-7267
    • Accession Number:
      10.1177/001872678904200203
    • Accession Number:
      4988339
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      CROUCH, A.; NIMRAN, U. Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers. Human Relations, [s. l.], v. 42, n. 2, p. 139, 1989. DOI 10.1177/001872678904200203. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=bsu&AN=4988339. Acesso em: 4 dez. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Crouch A, Nimran U. Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers. Human Relations. 1989;42(2):139. doi:10.1177/001872678904200203
    • APA:
      Crouch, A., & Nimran, U. (1989). Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers. Human Relations, 42(2), 139. https://doi.org/10.1177/001872678904200203
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Crouch, Andrew, and Umar Nimran. 1989. “Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers.” Human Relations 42 (2): 139. doi:10.1177/001872678904200203.
    • Harvard:
      Crouch, A. and Nimran, U. (1989) ‘Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers’, Human Relations, 42(2), p. 139. doi: 10.1177/001872678904200203.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Crouch, A & Nimran, U 1989, ‘Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers’, Human Relations, vol. 42, no. 2, p. 139, viewed 4 December 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Crouch, Andrew, and Umar Nimran. “Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers.” Human Relations, vol. 42, no. 2, Feb. 1989, p. 139. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1177/001872678904200203.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Crouch, Andrew, and Umar Nimran. “Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers.” Human Relations 42, no. 2 (February 1989): 139. doi:10.1177/001872678904200203.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Crouch A, Nimran U. Office Design and the Behavior of Senior Managers. Human Relations [Internet]. 1989 Feb [cited 2020 Dec 4];42(2):139. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=bsu&AN=4988339