Evaluating people's concern about their health information privacy based on power-responsibility equilibrium model: A case of Taiwan.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author-Supplied Keywords:
      Electronic medical records
      Government regulations
      Hospital privacy policy
      Information privacy concern
    • NAICS/Industry Codes:
      621498 All Other Outpatient Care Centers
      541519 Other Computer Related Services
      541514 Computer systems design and related services (except video game design and development)
    • Abstract:
      To address the issue of rising expenditure of healthcare service and to fulfill the skyrocketing demand for quality healthcare, the electronic medical records (EMR) exchange has become a vital and indispensable solution for healthcare facilities in terms of being able to share medical information among healthcare providers. Hence, EMR exchange was expected to improve the quality of healthcare and reduce the cost of repetitive medical check-ups and unnecessary treatments. However, recent reports affirming EMR data leaks and compromises have ignited major worldwide privacy concerns over the security of the EMR systems. How to effectively diminish patients' concern for EMR privacy has thus become an important issue that healthcare institution managers/stakeholders have to address urgently. This study leverages the power-responsibility equilibrium perspective to investigate the antecedents and consequences of concerns for the EMR exchange. A survey using 391 responses collected from medical centers, regional and district hospitals in Taiwan was used to conduct this study. The results show that government regulations have a positive effect on hospital privacy policies. Furthermore, both government regulations and hospital privacy policy are negatively associated with concern for EMR information privacy. Additional reports gathered from this study also showed that concern for EMR information privacy could result in patients' protective responses including refusal to provide personal health information (PHI), removal of PHI, negative word of mouth, complaining directly to the hospital, or complaining indirectly to third-party organizations. These findings demonstrate the need for healthcare facilities to formulate robust privacy policies in order to alleviate patients' concern for EMR information privacy based on governmental regulations. This regulation is top-priority as the incapability of reducing patients' concern for EMR information privacy may lead to the collapse of the campaign for the full-adoption of EMR or possibly jeopardize the promotion and application of EMR among healthcare facilities. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Journal of Medical Systems is the property of Springer Nature and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • Author Affiliations:
      1Institute of Information Management, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, 30010, Hsinchu, Taiwan
    • Full Text Word Count:
      5273
    • ISSN:
      0148-5598
    • Accession Number:
      10.1007/s10916-020-01579-6
    • Accession Number:
      143571484
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HWANG, H.-G.; LIN, Y. Evaluating people’s concern about their health information privacy based on power-responsibility equilibrium model: A case of Taiwan. Journal of Medical Systems, [s. l.], v. 44, n. 6, p. 1–9, 2020. DOI 10.1007/s10916-020-01579-6. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=143571484. Acesso em: 29 nov. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Hwang H-G, Lin Y. Evaluating people’s concern about their health information privacy based on power-responsibility equilibrium model: A case of Taiwan. Journal of Medical Systems. 2020;44(6):1-9. doi:10.1007/s10916-020-01579-6
    • APA:
      Hwang, H.-G., & Lin, Y. (2020). Evaluating people’s concern about their health information privacy based on power-responsibility equilibrium model: A case of Taiwan. Journal of Medical Systems, 44(6), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10916-020-01579-6
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Hwang, Hsin-Ginn, and Yun Lin. 2020. “Evaluating People’s Concern about Their Health Information Privacy Based on Power-Responsibility Equilibrium Model: A Case of Taiwan.” Journal of Medical Systems 44 (6): 1–9. doi:10.1007/s10916-020-01579-6.
    • Harvard:
      Hwang, H.-G. and Lin, Y. (2020) ‘Evaluating people’s concern about their health information privacy based on power-responsibility equilibrium model: A case of Taiwan’, Journal of Medical Systems, 44(6), pp. 1–9. doi: 10.1007/s10916-020-01579-6.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Hwang, H-G & Lin, Y 2020, ‘Evaluating people’s concern about their health information privacy based on power-responsibility equilibrium model: A case of Taiwan’, Journal of Medical Systems, vol. 44, no. 6, pp. 1–9, viewed 29 November 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Hwang, Hsin-Ginn, and Yun Lin. “Evaluating People’s Concern about Their Health Information Privacy Based on Power-Responsibility Equilibrium Model: A Case of Taiwan.” Journal of Medical Systems, vol. 44, no. 6, June 2020, pp. 1–9. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1007/s10916-020-01579-6.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Hwang, Hsin-Ginn, and Yun Lin. “Evaluating People’s Concern about Their Health Information Privacy Based on Power-Responsibility Equilibrium Model: A Case of Taiwan.” Journal of Medical Systems 44, no. 6 (June 2020): 1–9. doi:10.1007/s10916-020-01579-6.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Hwang H-G, Lin Y. Evaluating people’s concern about their health information privacy based on power-responsibility equilibrium model: A case of Taiwan. Journal of Medical Systems [Internet]. 2020 Jun [cited 2020 Nov 29];44(6):1–9. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=asn&AN=143571484